• JFJ Easy Pro Video Game, CD, DVD, Blu-Ray Repair Machine 110V
JFJ Easy Pro Video Game, CD, DVD, Blu-Ray Repair Machine 110V

JFJ Easy Pro Video Game, CD, DVD, Blu-Ray Repair Machine 110V

SKU:HA0RBE4B8
Sale price
£279.00
Regular price
£464.00
Unit price
per 
( 39% off )
Quantity:
Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

Tracked Shipping

Secure Payments

10 Days Return

  • 30-day unconditional money back guarantee. 1-year warranty on parts and labor.
  • NOTE: Check User Manual in English on Technical Specification before use
  • Works on all compact disc formats-Music CD, CD-Rom, DVDs, Sony Playstation, Playstation 2, Playstation 3, Playstation 4, X-BOX, X-box 360, XBOX ONE, Blu-ray, Wii, GameCube (supplies sold separately), CD-R, DVD-R, and HD DVD
  • Use a one step machine for skipping, finger print or light scratches or multi stage for deep gauges
  • Light weight, silent motor, safe compounds make the CD or DVD look brand new every time
  • No water, you do not have to deal with filter, water pump, water hose or dirty water
  • Includes JFJ Pro Disc Repair Machine, Anti Static Spray Cleaner, JFJ Pro Solutions 1 & 2, Sanding Pads, Buffing Pads
  • Easy pro maintenance is between 15 to 20 cents per repair

Customer Reviews

I started to have some problems in early 2017 and decided I needed a new one but was not too disappointed as nothing lasts foreverI have owned two of these machines over the last 7 years, the first one I bought direct from the company in 2011. I owned a gaming store and bought and sold used video games, I resurfaced many hundreds of games and it more than paid for itself. I started to have some problems in early 2017 and decided I needed a new one but was not too disappointed as nothing lasts forever. In June 2017 I bought a new one through Amazon, resurfaced many games throughout the summer with no problems. One day in September I plugged it in to resurface some games, it kept blowing my breaker, I tried it several times and still blew my breakers, must have a short in the motor. I called JFJ Easy Pro and explained my problem, they issued a call tag to have me send it back for repair, it had a year warranty on parts and service. After about a month they called to asked what the problem was, I explained it was shorting out, that was the last time I heard from them. I called several times after that and they kept blowing me off. Finally, today thay called me to inform me they were not going to repair it for me as they believed I was using resurfacing materials from another company which voided warranty, which was not true, I bought all my JFJ supplies directly through Amazon. I contacted Amazon today to see if there was some way they could help, maybe call the company and suggest to them that they should honor their warranty. Well, thanks to Amazon, I was refunded my total amount on the machine, including shipping. I was not really what I wanted, I would have be just as happy to have my old one repaired, was not looking for a freebie, but I am glad they went to bat for me. As far as the machines go, when they work, they work great and I still have an old one I bought 7 years ago I will still try and use. However, I am not happy with their company service and evidently they will try a find some made up way not to honor their warranty. 3Amazed at the results!I received my machine yesterday and immediately set out to try to resurface a bunch of garbage Xbox disks that wouldn't play...about 12 of them. Every single one works now. Even the ones that needed the sandpaper disk now work like new. I'm gonna sound like a TV pitchman here, but as a collector and a reseller, I turned garbage into $$$ with the help of the JFJ Easy Pro. And best of all, it's pretty easy to use, especially if you're doing a big batch at once and get a groove going.I'll try the cheaper polish as others have suggested when I run out of the stuff I've got now. Thanks, all! 5The good, the bad, the uglyI've done about 100 discs now, and believe I can help explain why reviews all over the map. The machine does a very good job of making discs smooth. But the real issue lies with the foil in the disc that stores information. If a disc gets too warm, the foil will wrinkle, making the disc unreadable. (hard to photograph, but you can see some of the raised streaks in foil in the solid gray area.)So, you can't just put a disc in and hit 2 minutes, or even one minute, except for perhaps the blue polish stage. Any disc you try to repair, you take a chance of ruining the disc. In summary, if your disc plays fine, either leave it alone or try just the polish stage. If your disc didn't work in the first place, this might fix it, but you really need to do each step in 10 or 20 second increments. Definately start with some cheap old discs to get used to how finicky the machine can be. 3It's pretty quiet but if you have it on something unstable ...Got it an hour ago. So far i fixed 5 games that wouldn't play. Removed all the scratches but left a few swirl marks. It's pretty quiet but if you have it on something unstable it's gonna vibrate a lot. Didn't see instructions but downloaded the pdf offline and it's good instructions. Well so far 5 for 5.....#WINNINGWill update at 90 days.Well. It hasn't been 90 days and the machine works great. Problem is that the blue solution will gunk up the pad so bad that it'll start making the machine vibrate violently. Figured out what it was when i added a little water to the pad. I'm sure it would have broke the disc. The pads need to be stored in plastic bags once they are used. For now I'll stick to 3 stars. They need to reformulate it from my brief experience. It's far too thick.Same night....can't stop it from vibrating. Even bought new pads less than a week after i got it. Think it was just a bad one because it worked great at first. Very simple process. If not for the vibrating it would have been perfect. Think I'll just keep paying to get them fixed for now. Contacted jfj themselves and they got me to send them a pic. Seems they could care less. I'm sure the machine cost them no more than a few bucks. 3Works great! Buy the Meguiar's Ultimate Compound and Polish!This little machine does a great job of resurfacing unusable discs and making them like new. I have used it at least 100 times for PS1 discs. It works great!However, the compound and polish that came with the kit is not NEARLY as good as the Meguiar's product that I bought to replace them. Do yourself (and your wallet) a favor and buy the Meguiar's Ultimate Compound and Polish to replace the white and blue bottles that come with the kit. You won't be disappointed! Use the "compound" in place of the white tube and the "polish" in place of the blue tube. I have realized MUCH better results when using the Meguiar's products (most automotive parts stores carry this product) instead of what came with the kit.Here is the kicker. When you research how much the JFJ replacement compound and polish is, you will find that it is about $10 for a 5oz bottle. The Meguire's product is the SAME price for 15oz!!!! 3 times less!! AND IT WORKS WAY BETTER!!!!Your welcome! :) 4Not like they used to beThis is my 4th JFJ Easy Pro machine. I can honestly say that the machine has declined from the first design I purchased. I am disappointed right out of the box. The buffing pad rest doesn't have velcro covering it like it should. Instead it looks like it has been cut with scissors and stuck down with creases. It looks like a crooked x and I'm questioning how it will hold up to use. I mean really, you guys can't afford a punch to cut out the proper size circle?Most notable changes are the massive increases of hard plastic parts from unit to unit. The last machine (number 3) quit in less than 12 months because one of the hard plastic arms snapped for no apparent reason. Machines 1 and 2 (different designs with better metal parts) had long lives of three years or more and only quit because the ac motors gave out. 2The Best I've Used! - Here Are My Pointers!I've tried several of these CD Repair Machines through the years -- all the cheaper ones, of course. Hand crank models. Small electric models. All with lingering issues and, mostly, tedious to use and not with completely satisfactory results. This is the best unit I've ever used and it's because of the powerful motor and self-contained design.I will not go into all the esoteric accolades and complaints that everyone else has already posted. I will simply say if you are an old-timer with 700+ CDs in your collection (I started buying CDs before I owned a player -- and that was the year they were introduced!), and if you are shocked by the condition they are in as you attempt to convert them to MP3 or other digital transportable formats -- then know this: a) Those CDs are completely recoverable if the "damage" is only on the silver side; and b) this is the repair machine you definitely want when you have a lot of CDs to recover! A $35 or $50 hand-crank unit is not going to do it for you. At least, not satisfactorily.If you are just starting out to convert your CDs to MP3s, you will find -- as I did -- that the conversion process is far more sensitive to scratched surfaces than the music players are, themselves. A CD that might seem to play "just fine" will not allow itself to be copied as easily. If your recording program is reporting lots of errors, or rebuffering repeatedly, or rescanning 3 and 4 times -- it's time to bring in a unit like this to save those CDs. If you only have a few in such a condition, then buying a new CD or the MP3 or iTunes version may be a better choice.Here are some Tips and Observations for use once you've bought this...a) I do not know why they call the first polish you use "Solution #2" and the second one you use "Solution #1" -- but they do. Solution 2 is a little thicker than Solution 1, so be aware before you squirt Solution 1 all over the place.b) Does this unit get a little messy? Yes. But not terribly so. And it's all contained within the unit so long as you are not crazy enough to open the lid while it's spinning the buffing pad and CD! 8-) But my Tip about using a Credit Card helps with this. Note: There is no avoiding getting your fingers messy as you remove the Buffing Pads from the machine and replace them with the next one. So get over it!c) The instructions for spreading the polish across the face of the buffing pad "with the tip of the bottle" are somewhat useless. The tip of the bottle is really not the correct shape to do this well. Squirt a few dollops of paste here and there on the pad, then use a Credit Card to spread the polish evenly. It gets easier as the pad gets used more. A dry pad absorbs more polish -- a used pad absorbs less. You do not need to cover the entire inner part of the pad up to the small hole because the retainer cap that locks the CD in place will cover about 1-1/8-in diameter from the center out. You do want to concentrate more on an even coating out to the very outside edges of each pad, however. Yes, this takes longer, but the results are vastly superior.d) Once you run your CD through Solution 2, I do recommend you heed the mfr's advice and proceed with using Solution 1 for the best results. That is a light aqua color and should be applied to the second buffing pad. You will notice that this polish is the one that gets flung about more because of its viscosity.e) After you are finished with Solution 1, remove the CD, and its locking cap. Then peel the Buffing Pad away from its turntable inside the unit. You'll notice a line of paste that has been flung against the inner walls of the machine. Carefully scrape off that goop with your Credit Card and reapply it to the Buffing Pad that has Solution 2 on it. This is all valuable paste and should not be discarded. NOTE: At first, I was reusing this paste on Buffing Pad 1, but that aqua polish is the finishing touch and needs to remain as pure as possible. Using the excess paste on the Buffing Pad with Solution 1 on it will degrade the final polishing. I switched to using it on the Buffing Pad with Solution 2 -- and although it discolors that white paste over time, it is a better choice. Mark the pads with a Sharpie if you start getting confused. Keep the Aqua Paste Solution 1 as pure as you can.f) If you must resort to using the actual 3M Sanding Discs for deeply-scratched CDs, you may wish to discard the excess goop that you scrape off the inner walls. I have not had to resort to these discs so I cannot swear if their sanding surface creates a gritty residue. If so, you might wish to discard that goop. If you have kids and they abuse these discs, I can see that the Sanding Pads might be very useful.g) While you have the Locking Cap off, and are preparing to insert the next CD, wipe off the bottom of that Cap so it can seat against the next CD properly. Don't let the goop fill up its threaded screw area, or under the Cap, itself.I did not find it useful to count just how many CDs the first bottles of polish might recover because some CDs have deep scratches and need more polishing than others. So, your mileage may vary. I had a few that required 2 passes. And if you don't always use Solution 1, then it affects how much of that polish you use, as well. But I got quite a large stack resuscitated, so far. I have not actually finished either bottle as I write this, and have not refinished all 700+ CDs in my collection.Also, the Wiping Cloths that come with the unit really should be replaced with Microfiber Towels. My method was to rinse my CDs in a sink and then pat them dry with Microfiber -- not a hand towel or paper towels (too coarse). Do not use paper of any kind -- not toilet paper or napkins. These are all too harsh and will scratch surfaces.This system is NOT complicated. Everything about it -- except the motor housing, itself -- is built around commonly-available supplies. The Buffing Pads are similar to 3M "Perfect-It" pads @ 4-5/8-in Diameter. The Sanding Disks are 3M discs. Even the two polishing solutions are available by other mfrs. So don't feel trapped by JFJ. Their prices are probably as competitive as anyone's, however. The trick is, don't buy more solution than you'll need, as the polish (like most car waxes) may get gummy or watery over time. It will not store indefinitely.If this item seems too costly for you, consider these points:You can waste a lot of money buying tools that really are not suited for the job. And you probably have. If you own 10 CDs that need polishing, then buy the hand-crank model. If you have over 100, this unit will serve you better. You can always sell it, later, because these are quite popular and well-respected. If I were a shop selling used CDs, I'd set one of these up on the counter and offer to clean 2 or 3 free for each customer -- they'd buy it after seeing the results. Swirl marks are almost invisible. The mirror-effect is very nearly as good as a new CD. 5Works as advertised and will repair and restore many CDsI have to say this machine works quite well, and also that the reviews posted here were very helpful in figuring out how to use it - more helpful than the instructions. I've used mine so far to de-scratch about 300 CDs, and I plan to finish another 300. (I acquired some big collections cheaply, but many discs had scratches.) The machine definitely works as advertised. I've turned many completely gnarly discs into very good or even like new CDs that look great and play perfectly. It can be expensive to use these machines, since you'll need a fair quantity of the accessories (sandpaper, pads, and white solution) to repair a large quantity of discs. But if you have a record shop, a large collection, or for some other reason need to clean a fair but not industrial number of CDs, this will get the job done.And here are my quick tips - garnered from some other people here and on other sites, and tested with more than 300 good repairs:- Before repairing a scratched CD, hold it up to the light with the label facing you: if you see big pinholes of light forget it, you can't fix that ... 1-2 pinholes, then test those tracks before trying to repair (read about how CDs are put together to understand this)- Use sandpaper (coarser 600 grit first, then finer 1200 grit) on most of your discs with scratches of any significance, just as the instructions suggest - but longer than they may indicate - I almost always do 40-60 seconds on 600 grit, and half that much on 1200 grit. On super gnarly discs, I try 80-120 seconds, but be careful because you can sand through a disc.- You can use the same sandpaper pieces for many many discs- If the sandpaper gets clogged, just rinse it off and let it dry - it's wet/dry sandpaper so you can do that- When you buy accessories, ONLY buy the JFJ pro stuff - it's the same basic price as the knockoffs, but the knockoff pads do NOT work nearly as well, and in fact they suck- The instructions tell you to do a two-step process with the white solution and then the blue BUT- You can skip the blue solution for all or most CDs - in my experience it's worthless- The white solution you'll need a lot of- Dump out the little spray bottle of cleaning solution - totally worthless- Instead, put water in that bottle ... before loading a buffing pad with white solution, mist it with several pump sprays of water (don't soak, just mist)- Then use the white solution as directed, but always apply more than the instructions suggest, like 6 dime sized dots each time- Spread it around the pad using a plastic knife- After buffing with the white stuff for two minutes, just rinse your CDs under tap water and then rub some soap on with just your finger (not a scratchy towel) and rinse ALL of the white solution off- Goal is to get all the white residue off- You can wipe the CDs with microfiber cloths, which are washable - this will save you some money (they sell them at Target or Wal-Mart with carwash supplies)Last tip: The white buffing pads with white solution work great, but it takes a while to break in a new pad. The first 3-4 CDs don't seem to get the best treatment, so maybe don't start with your prized Led Zeppellin remasters - save them for once you've worn down the buffing pad a bit, which is when they work best. 5If you handle a lot of used discs, you will love this machine!At the time of this review, I have been using my JFJ Easy Pro for about 6 months, so I'm going to write a review from the point of view of a novice users who bought this product with no prior experience of using a disc repair system. However, a used record store which I frequent owns a more expensive JFJ machine and allowed me to pick their brains for some valuable operating tips.I should also mention that I have at this time successfully repaired several hundred discs. I have not used ANY of the sandpaper pads, the #1 Blue polishing solution, or anything else supplied with this machine other than the #2 White solution and the foam buffing pads. That's because this combo will repair 99% of discs that are worth repairing. I frequent garage sales, thrift stores, and flea markets, looking primarily for music CDs to expand my collection. I dont't usually waste my time or money on discs that are so bad they would need to be sanded, though I can imagine if you were in IT for example and had a really destroyed data disc you needed to recover, it might warrant use of some other repair strategy, for me the White Solution + foam pads are all I ever need.Choosing discs to repair: The data layer on an optical disc is near the "top" of the disc - that is, the label side, just beneath the label. That's how this machine works - there's a thick layer of polycarb on the non-label side which can be polished to remove scratches on it's surface without affecting the data on the disc. So most discs which don't have damage to the data layer can be fixed. Simply hold the disc up to a strong light. If you can see daylight through any of the shiny areas of the disc then the data is damaged and you will not be able to fix the disc 100% no matter how much polishing or sanding you do. As an aside, optical discs are read from the hub first and out towards the edge, so the first track on your CD, for example, will be located nearest to the center of the disc and so forth. This gives you some idea where to look for that scratch which is causing your disc to skip or your DVD to lock up.This machine is simple to operate. There's no real need to "practice" as some reviewers maintain - unless you plan to use the more radical sanding options. Here's tip #1 from my record store friends: Get a spritzer bottle of water and moisten the foam pad before each use. Don't soak it, just get it damp and then apply the white solution. I apply the solution to the pad in a ring and then spread it out to the edges with my fingers. There is a 1-1/4" patch in center of the pad which doesn't need solution on it - this corresponds to the hub of the disc which doesn't get polished.Next, attach your disc to the spindle on the lid. The clear, non-label side will face down when the lid is closed. Here is another very important piece of information that my friends warned me about. BE VERY CAREFUL SCREWING DOWN THE DISC! Make sure that the plastic screw, which is threaded somewhat imprecisely, doesn't get cross-threaded, so that the disc can wobble ever so slightly when it is being polished. This is the source of the cracked disc hubs that other reviewers have mentioned. So use both hands to press the disc down absolutely flat against the top surface, make sure it hasn't gotten hooked on the screw threads, and then carefully and gently screw on the nut that holds the disc in place. If it doesn't go on easily, back off and try again until it does. Once you've got it on right, tighten it down good and finger tight.Now you're ready to polish the disc. Watch a movie or something. Put on some headphones because this machine is pretty noisy. Keep a rag handy to wipe the compound off of your fingers if you're going to be doing a number of discs. Remove all the discs from their cases at the beginning, so you don't have to handle the cases with polish-covered fingers. Now, using the #2 polish and a foam pad as I do, there's no risk of over-polishing a disc. If you just want to remove finger-prints etc, a single two-minute run will be enough. Otherwise, I have found that giving all my scratched discs three two-minute runs for a total of six minutes of polishing works best. I don't add more compound between runs. Most discs that are not repaired after this time are not salvageable, but if your really really want that disc, you can try another six minute set on it. Note that this machine will get hot, especially if you are doing six minutes for each disc, so keep an eye on it and give it time to cool off every now and then. If the nut has gotten too hot and you can't loosen it to remove the CD, I have found that a spritz of cool water will usually loosen it.After polishing, it is safe to stack the repaired CDs on top of one another, and even to put them aside for later washing. The compound will not "harden" on the discs. To remove the compound, I take a batch at a time into the bathroom spread them out on the counter label side down, then I put a drop of dishwashing liquid (non greasy, like Dawn) on each disc. I run some very warm water and using my fingers I wash and rinse the discs and then stick them inside the folds of a cotton bath towel to dry. Here's another tip from me: Make sure you get all the compound off the disc, especially in the central hub are, which often has a groove around it in which the compound can remain. If you don't get all the compound off, it will smear around your disc when you give it the final touch up. For me, the touch up is nothing fancy. Like I said, I don't use any of the other equipment or sprays you are provided with this kit. I just dry the discs off and look for scratches. There are some advanced scratch removal techniques you can employ at this time which involve spit, your fingertips, and a white cotton T-shirt, but these are not part of my official recommendations. :)Here are a couple more non-official non-recommendations which are sure to void your warranty, so try at your own risk:Meguiar's Ultimate Compound (Car polish) is almost, but not quite as good a JFJ Compound #2, and quite a bit cheaper. It works!After you've polished a number of discs, you will see a lot of gunk inside the machine which is made up of used compound, tiny worn fragments of foam pad, and presumably, tiny bits of poly carbon. This can be scooped off and re-used as buffing compound as long as you're using a spritzer bottle to keep everything moist. Just smear it all back on the pad. (Update: I wouldn't do this if you have used the sandpaper on any discs!)BTW I have repaired several hundred discs at least, and have only used the original two foam pads that came with the system. Neither of them has completely worn out, so I think you can expect to get a couple hundred uses at least (remember I do SIX MINUTES! per disk) out of these pads - IF YOU KEEP THEM MOIST.In summation, this is a great product, works exactly as described, and has been a boon to my CD collection, enabling me to scoop up and refurbish many rare used discs that others simply pass by. Like many such tools (like ink-jet printers for example) they really nail you on the supplies, however. I hope my tips will prove useful and help others to mitigate this at least a little. 5The JFJ Easy Pro does a fantastic job of bringing your discs back to new condition.The JFJ Easy Pro does a fantastic job of bringing your discs back to new condition.I ve now resurfaced about 50 discs (CD, DVD, Blu-ray) and after some time with it I can now resurface a disc to a mirror-like condition without swirl marks. XBOX 360, no problem. Note: you can only polish, not sand a Blu-ray disc.Here is a huge tip; get a small spray bottle and fill it with water. Hit the white and blue pads with a few sprays before adding the creams. This will cut down on the amount of white and blue cream you use and keeping those pads moist is the key to a mirror like finish.Don't fear the sanding discs, they are the only way to remove deep to medium scratchesEasily go from a trash disc to NM (near mint) 5
See All Reviews
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Description
  • 30-day unconditional money back guarantee. 1-year warranty on parts and labor.
  • NOTE: Check User Manual in English on Technical Specification before use
  • Works on all compact disc formats-Music CD, CD-Rom, DVDs, Sony Playstation, Playstation 2, Playstation 3, Playstation 4, X-BOX, X-box 360, XBOX ONE, Blu-ray, Wii, GameCube (supplies sold separately), CD-R, DVD-R, and HD DVD
  • Use a one step machine for skipping, finger print or light scratches or multi stage for deep gauges
  • Light weight, silent motor, safe compounds make the CD or DVD look brand new every time
  • No water, you do not have to deal with filter, water pump, water hose or dirty water
  • Includes JFJ Pro Disc Repair Machine, Anti Static Spray Cleaner, JFJ Pro Solutions 1 & 2, Sanding Pads, Buffing Pads
  • Easy pro maintenance is between 15 to 20 cents per repair
Reviews

Customer Reviews

I started to have some problems in early 2017 and decided I needed a new one but was not too disappointed as nothing lasts foreverI have owned two of these machines over the last 7 years, the first one I bought direct from the company in 2011. I owned a gaming store and bought and sold used video games, I resurfaced many hundreds of games and it more than paid for itself. I started to have some problems in early 2017 and decided I needed a new one but was not too disappointed as nothing lasts forever. In June 2017 I bought a new one through Amazon, resurfaced many games throughout the summer with no problems. One day in September I plugged it in to resurface some games, it kept blowing my breaker, I tried it several times and still blew my breakers, must have a short in the motor. I called JFJ Easy Pro and explained my problem, they issued a call tag to have me send it back for repair, it had a year warranty on parts and service. After about a month they called to asked what the problem was, I explained it was shorting out, that was the last time I heard from them. I called several times after that and they kept blowing me off. Finally, today thay called me to inform me they were not going to repair it for me as they believed I was using resurfacing materials from another company which voided warranty, which was not true, I bought all my JFJ supplies directly through Amazon. I contacted Amazon today to see if there was some way they could help, maybe call the company and suggest to them that they should honor their warranty. Well, thanks to Amazon, I was refunded my total amount on the machine, including shipping. I was not really what I wanted, I would have be just as happy to have my old one repaired, was not looking for a freebie, but I am glad they went to bat for me. As far as the machines go, when they work, they work great and I still have an old one I bought 7 years ago I will still try and use. However, I am not happy with their company service and evidently they will try a find some made up way not to honor their warranty. 3Amazed at the results!I received my machine yesterday and immediately set out to try to resurface a bunch of garbage Xbox disks that wouldn't play...about 12 of them. Every single one works now. Even the ones that needed the sandpaper disk now work like new. I'm gonna sound like a TV pitchman here, but as a collector and a reseller, I turned garbage into $$$ with the help of the JFJ Easy Pro. And best of all, it's pretty easy to use, especially if you're doing a big batch at once and get a groove going.I'll try the cheaper polish as others have suggested when I run out of the stuff I've got now. Thanks, all! 5The good, the bad, the uglyI've done about 100 discs now, and believe I can help explain why reviews all over the map. The machine does a very good job of making discs smooth. But the real issue lies with the foil in the disc that stores information. If a disc gets too warm, the foil will wrinkle, making the disc unreadable. (hard to photograph, but you can see some of the raised streaks in foil in the solid gray area.)So, you can't just put a disc in and hit 2 minutes, or even one minute, except for perhaps the blue polish stage. Any disc you try to repair, you take a chance of ruining the disc. In summary, if your disc plays fine, either leave it alone or try just the polish stage. If your disc didn't work in the first place, this might fix it, but you really need to do each step in 10 or 20 second increments. Definately start with some cheap old discs to get used to how finicky the machine can be. 3It's pretty quiet but if you have it on something unstable ...Got it an hour ago. So far i fixed 5 games that wouldn't play. Removed all the scratches but left a few swirl marks. It's pretty quiet but if you have it on something unstable it's gonna vibrate a lot. Didn't see instructions but downloaded the pdf offline and it's good instructions. Well so far 5 for 5.....#WINNINGWill update at 90 days.Well. It hasn't been 90 days and the machine works great. Problem is that the blue solution will gunk up the pad so bad that it'll start making the machine vibrate violently. Figured out what it was when i added a little water to the pad. I'm sure it would have broke the disc. The pads need to be stored in plastic bags once they are used. For now I'll stick to 3 stars. They need to reformulate it from my brief experience. It's far too thick.Same night....can't stop it from vibrating. Even bought new pads less than a week after i got it. Think it was just a bad one because it worked great at first. Very simple process. If not for the vibrating it would have been perfect. Think I'll just keep paying to get them fixed for now. Contacted jfj themselves and they got me to send them a pic. Seems they could care less. I'm sure the machine cost them no more than a few bucks. 3Works great! Buy the Meguiar's Ultimate Compound and Polish!This little machine does a great job of resurfacing unusable discs and making them like new. I have used it at least 100 times for PS1 discs. It works great!However, the compound and polish that came with the kit is not NEARLY as good as the Meguiar's product that I bought to replace them. Do yourself (and your wallet) a favor and buy the Meguiar's Ultimate Compound and Polish to replace the white and blue bottles that come with the kit. You won't be disappointed! Use the "compound" in place of the white tube and the "polish" in place of the blue tube. I have realized MUCH better results when using the Meguiar's products (most automotive parts stores carry this product) instead of what came with the kit.Here is the kicker. When you research how much the JFJ replacement compound and polish is, you will find that it is about $10 for a 5oz bottle. The Meguire's product is the SAME price for 15oz!!!! 3 times less!! AND IT WORKS WAY BETTER!!!!Your welcome! :) 4Not like they used to beThis is my 4th JFJ Easy Pro machine. I can honestly say that the machine has declined from the first design I purchased. I am disappointed right out of the box. The buffing pad rest doesn't have velcro covering it like it should. Instead it looks like it has been cut with scissors and stuck down with creases. It looks like a crooked x and I'm questioning how it will hold up to use. I mean really, you guys can't afford a punch to cut out the proper size circle?Most notable changes are the massive increases of hard plastic parts from unit to unit. The last machine (number 3) quit in less than 12 months because one of the hard plastic arms snapped for no apparent reason. Machines 1 and 2 (different designs with better metal parts) had long lives of three years or more and only quit because the ac motors gave out. 2The Best I've Used! - Here Are My Pointers!I've tried several of these CD Repair Machines through the years -- all the cheaper ones, of course. Hand crank models. Small electric models. All with lingering issues and, mostly, tedious to use and not with completely satisfactory results. This is the best unit I've ever used and it's because of the powerful motor and self-contained design.I will not go into all the esoteric accolades and complaints that everyone else has already posted. I will simply say if you are an old-timer with 700+ CDs in your collection (I started buying CDs before I owned a player -- and that was the year they were introduced!), and if you are shocked by the condition they are in as you attempt to convert them to MP3 or other digital transportable formats -- then know this: a) Those CDs are completely recoverable if the "damage" is only on the silver side; and b) this is the repair machine you definitely want when you have a lot of CDs to recover! A $35 or $50 hand-crank unit is not going to do it for you. At least, not satisfactorily.If you are just starting out to convert your CDs to MP3s, you will find -- as I did -- that the conversion process is far more sensitive to scratched surfaces than the music players are, themselves. A CD that might seem to play "just fine" will not allow itself to be copied as easily. If your recording program is reporting lots of errors, or rebuffering repeatedly, or rescanning 3 and 4 times -- it's time to bring in a unit like this to save those CDs. If you only have a few in such a condition, then buying a new CD or the MP3 or iTunes version may be a better choice.Here are some Tips and Observations for use once you've bought this...a) I do not know why they call the first polish you use "Solution #2" and the second one you use "Solution #1" -- but they do. Solution 2 is a little thicker than Solution 1, so be aware before you squirt Solution 1 all over the place.b) Does this unit get a little messy? Yes. But not terribly so. And it's all contained within the unit so long as you are not crazy enough to open the lid while it's spinning the buffing pad and CD! 8-) But my Tip about using a Credit Card helps with this. Note: There is no avoiding getting your fingers messy as you remove the Buffing Pads from the machine and replace them with the next one. So get over it!c) The instructions for spreading the polish across the face of the buffing pad "with the tip of the bottle" are somewhat useless. The tip of the bottle is really not the correct shape to do this well. Squirt a few dollops of paste here and there on the pad, then use a Credit Card to spread the polish evenly. It gets easier as the pad gets used more. A dry pad absorbs more polish -- a used pad absorbs less. You do not need to cover the entire inner part of the pad up to the small hole because the retainer cap that locks the CD in place will cover about 1-1/8-in diameter from the center out. You do want to concentrate more on an even coating out to the very outside edges of each pad, however. Yes, this takes longer, but the results are vastly superior.d) Once you run your CD through Solution 2, I do recommend you heed the mfr's advice and proceed with using Solution 1 for the best results. That is a light aqua color and should be applied to the second buffing pad. You will notice that this polish is the one that gets flung about more because of its viscosity.e) After you are finished with Solution 1, remove the CD, and its locking cap. Then peel the Buffing Pad away from its turntable inside the unit. You'll notice a line of paste that has been flung against the inner walls of the machine. Carefully scrape off that goop with your Credit Card and reapply it to the Buffing Pad that has Solution 2 on it. This is all valuable paste and should not be discarded. NOTE: At first, I was reusing this paste on Buffing Pad 1, but that aqua polish is the finishing touch and needs to remain as pure as possible. Using the excess paste on the Buffing Pad with Solution 1 on it will degrade the final polishing. I switched to using it on the Buffing Pad with Solution 2 -- and although it discolors that white paste over time, it is a better choice. Mark the pads with a Sharpie if you start getting confused. Keep the Aqua Paste Solution 1 as pure as you can.f) If you must resort to using the actual 3M Sanding Discs for deeply-scratched CDs, you may wish to discard the excess goop that you scrape off the inner walls. I have not had to resort to these discs so I cannot swear if their sanding surface creates a gritty residue. If so, you might wish to discard that goop. If you have kids and they abuse these discs, I can see that the Sanding Pads might be very useful.g) While you have the Locking Cap off, and are preparing to insert the next CD, wipe off the bottom of that Cap so it can seat against the next CD properly. Don't let the goop fill up its threaded screw area, or under the Cap, itself.I did not find it useful to count just how many CDs the first bottles of polish might recover because some CDs have deep scratches and need more polishing than others. So, your mileage may vary. I had a few that required 2 passes. And if you don't always use Solution 1, then it affects how much of that polish you use, as well. But I got quite a large stack resuscitated, so far. I have not actually finished either bottle as I write this, and have not refinished all 700+ CDs in my collection.Also, the Wiping Cloths that come with the unit really should be replaced with Microfiber Towels. My method was to rinse my CDs in a sink and then pat them dry with Microfiber -- not a hand towel or paper towels (too coarse). Do not use paper of any kind -- not toilet paper or napkins. These are all too harsh and will scratch surfaces.This system is NOT complicated. Everything about it -- except the motor housing, itself -- is built around commonly-available supplies. The Buffing Pads are similar to 3M "Perfect-It" pads @ 4-5/8-in Diameter. The Sanding Disks are 3M discs. Even the two polishing solutions are available by other mfrs. So don't feel trapped by JFJ. Their prices are probably as competitive as anyone's, however. The trick is, don't buy more solution than you'll need, as the polish (like most car waxes) may get gummy or watery over time. It will not store indefinitely.If this item seems too costly for you, consider these points:You can waste a lot of money buying tools that really are not suited for the job. And you probably have. If you own 10 CDs that need polishing, then buy the hand-crank model. If you have over 100, this unit will serve you better. You can always sell it, later, because these are quite popular and well-respected. If I were a shop selling used CDs, I'd set one of these up on the counter and offer to clean 2 or 3 free for each customer -- they'd buy it after seeing the results. Swirl marks are almost invisible. The mirror-effect is very nearly as good as a new CD. 5Works as advertised and will repair and restore many CDsI have to say this machine works quite well, and also that the reviews posted here were very helpful in figuring out how to use it - more helpful than the instructions. I've used mine so far to de-scratch about 300 CDs, and I plan to finish another 300. (I acquired some big collections cheaply, but many discs had scratches.) The machine definitely works as advertised. I've turned many completely gnarly discs into very good or even like new CDs that look great and play perfectly. It can be expensive to use these machines, since you'll need a fair quantity of the accessories (sandpaper, pads, and white solution) to repair a large quantity of discs. But if you have a record shop, a large collection, or for some other reason need to clean a fair but not industrial number of CDs, this will get the job done.And here are my quick tips - garnered from some other people here and on other sites, and tested with more than 300 good repairs:- Before repairing a scratched CD, hold it up to the light with the label facing you: if you see big pinholes of light forget it, you can't fix that ... 1-2 pinholes, then test those tracks before trying to repair (read about how CDs are put together to understand this)- Use sandpaper (coarser 600 grit first, then finer 1200 grit) on most of your discs with scratches of any significance, just as the instructions suggest - but longer than they may indicate - I almost always do 40-60 seconds on 600 grit, and half that much on 1200 grit. On super gnarly discs, I try 80-120 seconds, but be careful because you can sand through a disc.- You can use the same sandpaper pieces for many many discs- If the sandpaper gets clogged, just rinse it off and let it dry - it's wet/dry sandpaper so you can do that- When you buy accessories, ONLY buy the JFJ pro stuff - it's the same basic price as the knockoffs, but the knockoff pads do NOT work nearly as well, and in fact they suck- The instructions tell you to do a two-step process with the white solution and then the blue BUT- You can skip the blue solution for all or most CDs - in my experience it's worthless- The white solution you'll need a lot of- Dump out the little spray bottle of cleaning solution - totally worthless- Instead, put water in that bottle ... before loading a buffing pad with white solution, mist it with several pump sprays of water (don't soak, just mist)- Then use the white solution as directed, but always apply more than the instructions suggest, like 6 dime sized dots each time- Spread it around the pad using a plastic knife- After buffing with the white stuff for two minutes, just rinse your CDs under tap water and then rub some soap on with just your finger (not a scratchy towel) and rinse ALL of the white solution off- Goal is to get all the white residue off- You can wipe the CDs with microfiber cloths, which are washable - this will save you some money (they sell them at Target or Wal-Mart with carwash supplies)Last tip: The white buffing pads with white solution work great, but it takes a while to break in a new pad. The first 3-4 CDs don't seem to get the best treatment, so maybe don't start with your prized Led Zeppellin remasters - save them for once you've worn down the buffing pad a bit, which is when they work best. 5If you handle a lot of used discs, you will love this machine!At the time of this review, I have been using my JFJ Easy Pro for about 6 months, so I'm going to write a review from the point of view of a novice users who bought this product with no prior experience of using a disc repair system. However, a used record store which I frequent owns a more expensive JFJ machine and allowed me to pick their brains for some valuable operating tips.I should also mention that I have at this time successfully repaired several hundred discs. I have not used ANY of the sandpaper pads, the #1 Blue polishing solution, or anything else supplied with this machine other than the #2 White solution and the foam buffing pads. That's because this combo will repair 99% of discs that are worth repairing. I frequent garage sales, thrift stores, and flea markets, looking primarily for music CDs to expand my collection. I dont't usually waste my time or money on discs that are so bad they would need to be sanded, though I can imagine if you were in IT for example and had a really destroyed data disc you needed to recover, it might warrant use of some other repair strategy, for me the White Solution + foam pads are all I ever need.Choosing discs to repair: The data layer on an optical disc is near the "top" of the disc - that is, the label side, just beneath the label. That's how this machine works - there's a thick layer of polycarb on the non-label side which can be polished to remove scratches on it's surface without affecting the data on the disc. So most discs which don't have damage to the data layer can be fixed. Simply hold the disc up to a strong light. If you can see daylight through any of the shiny areas of the disc then the data is damaged and you will not be able to fix the disc 100% no matter how much polishing or sanding you do. As an aside, optical discs are read from the hub first and out towards the edge, so the first track on your CD, for example, will be located nearest to the center of the disc and so forth. This gives you some idea where to look for that scratch which is causing your disc to skip or your DVD to lock up.This machine is simple to operate. There's no real need to "practice" as some reviewers maintain - unless you plan to use the more radical sanding options. Here's tip #1 from my record store friends: Get a spritzer bottle of water and moisten the foam pad before each use. Don't soak it, just get it damp and then apply the white solution. I apply the solution to the pad in a ring and then spread it out to the edges with my fingers. There is a 1-1/4" patch in center of the pad which doesn't need solution on it - this corresponds to the hub of the disc which doesn't get polished.Next, attach your disc to the spindle on the lid. The clear, non-label side will face down when the lid is closed. Here is another very important piece of information that my friends warned me about. BE VERY CAREFUL SCREWING DOWN THE DISC! Make sure that the plastic screw, which is threaded somewhat imprecisely, doesn't get cross-threaded, so that the disc can wobble ever so slightly when it is being polished. This is the source of the cracked disc hubs that other reviewers have mentioned. So use both hands to press the disc down absolutely flat against the top surface, make sure it hasn't gotten hooked on the screw threads, and then carefully and gently screw on the nut that holds the disc in place. If it doesn't go on easily, back off and try again until it does. Once you've got it on right, tighten it down good and finger tight.Now you're ready to polish the disc. Watch a movie or something. Put on some headphones because this machine is pretty noisy. Keep a rag handy to wipe the compound off of your fingers if you're going to be doing a number of discs. Remove all the discs from their cases at the beginning, so you don't have to handle the cases with polish-covered fingers. Now, using the #2 polish and a foam pad as I do, there's no risk of over-polishing a disc. If you just want to remove finger-prints etc, a single two-minute run will be enough. Otherwise, I have found that giving all my scratched discs three two-minute runs for a total of six minutes of polishing works best. I don't add more compound between runs. Most discs that are not repaired after this time are not salvageable, but if your really really want that disc, you can try another six minute set on it. Note that this machine will get hot, especially if you are doing six minutes for each disc, so keep an eye on it and give it time to cool off every now and then. If the nut has gotten too hot and you can't loosen it to remove the CD, I have found that a spritz of cool water will usually loosen it.After polishing, it is safe to stack the repaired CDs on top of one another, and even to put them aside for later washing. The compound will not "harden" on the discs. To remove the compound, I take a batch at a time into the bathroom spread them out on the counter label side down, then I put a drop of dishwashing liquid (non greasy, like Dawn) on each disc. I run some very warm water and using my fingers I wash and rinse the discs and then stick them inside the folds of a cotton bath towel to dry. Here's another tip from me: Make sure you get all the compound off the disc, especially in the central hub are, which often has a groove around it in which the compound can remain. If you don't get all the compound off, it will smear around your disc when you give it the final touch up. For me, the touch up is nothing fancy. Like I said, I don't use any of the other equipment or sprays you are provided with this kit. I just dry the discs off and look for scratches. There are some advanced scratch removal techniques you can employ at this time which involve spit, your fingertips, and a white cotton T-shirt, but these are not part of my official recommendations. :)Here are a couple more non-official non-recommendations which are sure to void your warranty, so try at your own risk:Meguiar's Ultimate Compound (Car polish) is almost, but not quite as good a JFJ Compound #2, and quite a bit cheaper. It works!After you've polished a number of discs, you will see a lot of gunk inside the machine which is made up of used compound, tiny worn fragments of foam pad, and presumably, tiny bits of poly carbon. This can be scooped off and re-used as buffing compound as long as you're using a spritzer bottle to keep everything moist. Just smear it all back on the pad. (Update: I wouldn't do this if you have used the sandpaper on any discs!)BTW I have repaired several hundred discs at least, and have only used the original two foam pads that came with the system. Neither of them has completely worn out, so I think you can expect to get a couple hundred uses at least (remember I do SIX MINUTES! per disk) out of these pads - IF YOU KEEP THEM MOIST.In summation, this is a great product, works exactly as described, and has been a boon to my CD collection, enabling me to scoop up and refurbish many rare used discs that others simply pass by. Like many such tools (like ink-jet printers for example) they really nail you on the supplies, however. I hope my tips will prove useful and help others to mitigate this at least a little. 5The JFJ Easy Pro does a fantastic job of bringing your discs back to new condition.The JFJ Easy Pro does a fantastic job of bringing your discs back to new condition.I ve now resurfaced about 50 discs (CD, DVD, Blu-ray) and after some time with it I can now resurface a disc to a mirror-like condition without swirl marks. XBOX 360, no problem. Note: you can only polish, not sand a Blu-ray disc.Here is a huge tip; get a small spray bottle and fill it with water. Hit the white and blue pads with a few sprays before adding the creams. This will cut down on the amount of white and blue cream you use and keeping those pads moist is the key to a mirror like finish.Don't fear the sanding discs, they are the only way to remove deep to medium scratchesEasily go from a trash disc to NM (near mint) 5
See All Reviews
Return And Refund Policy
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Delivery Policy
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.

Recently Viewed

BACK TO TOP