• Tokina 17-35mm f/4 AT-X Pro FX Lens for Nikon
Tokina 17-35mm f/4 AT-X Pro FX Lens for Nikon

Tokina 17-35mm f/4 AT-X Pro FX Lens for Nikon

SKU:HA5AM8Z3W
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£498.00
Regular price
£830.00
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per 
( 40% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

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  • This version is intended for sale within the USA, 3 Year Limited Tokina Warranty
  • Fits Nikon DX Cameras 18-42mm Equivalency in 35mm Format
  • AF/MF Clutch Mechanism Molded Glass Aspherical Lens Elements
  • Ultra-Low Dispersion Glass

Customer Reviews

I'm very happy with the performance of this lens at 17mm I'm very happy with the performance of this lens at 17mm. It really put a new perspective into my pictures. 5A practical review - this fills a much needed void in the wide-angle game. This review is based on practical application and it's ability to fit a specific need. Look elsewhere if you want a technical review of sharpness, light transmission, aberration, vignetting, blah blah blah.If you're looking at this lens, you're probably in the same position I was in not long ago and wrestling with the same tough decision. You have a full frame camera. You probably bought it not long ago. You've already bought solid f/4 or f/2.8 tele zoom and normal zoom lenses. Now you're looking to round out the package with a wide-angle zoom but you don't have an unlimited budget.The options I considered were several. Below is a list of reasons why I did not choose these lenses. They all have their strengths and, to the right person, warrant the purchase over this Tokina 17-35. I knew my intended use, how much I'd use it, and minimum requirements. This definitely helped in making my final decision. Your needs (and budget) may be different and this is only my opinion. That said:Nikon 14-24 f/2.8 - Too expensive, limited zoomNikon 16-35 f/4 - Too expensive (very close 2nd)Nikon 17-35 f/2.8 - Still a little pricey, used market only, quite heavyNikon 18-35 f/3.5-4.5 - Still expensive for what you get, lower build quality, not constant aperture, 18mm isn't wide enoughTokina 16-28 f/2.8 - Does not allow use of filters, 28mm is a little too shortThose are the lenses I juggled with in my head. There are other wide zooms out there but experience has taught me to stick with Nikon or Tokina glass. However, I've read a few reports that Tamron and Sigma quality control is on the rise.The Nikon 16-35 f/4 was the closest contender for me. I like to do car photography with the camera suspended from a rig attached to the car for motion blur effects. The Nikon is the only lens of the bunch to have Vibration Reduction and when you have a camera on the end of a long pole you are bound to get vibration. This also uses a 77mm filter thread which is a lot more convenient (and cheaper) than 82mm options. These shots require 1-2 second shutter speeds so being able to attach an ND filter is essential to me. *If I had a the extra $400-$500 to spend, I would choose the Nikon 16-35 f/4*After about two months of using this lens, I am mostly happy with my decision. The focal length is perfect. I occasionally shoot weddings and the extra reach up to 35mm makes the job easier. F/4 is sufficiently fast and the added bulk of the f/2.8 lenses isn't worth a single stop in my opinion. Tokina build quality is always outstanding and certainly on par with Nikon's best zooms. What I do not like is the huge 82mm filter thread and the focus clutch that all Tokina lenses use. 82mm filters are very expensive. The funky on/off system of the focus clutch isn't that big of a deal, but for this level of lens I would've liked the newer clutch style with full time manual focus override.So, as you can see, my decision had nothing to do with which lens was sharper than the other. In practice, ALL of these lenses will deliver totally acceptable sharpness. If you require the absolute sharpest wide-angle lens available, then move on and start looking at prime lenses. 4DANGEROUS to your camera. Do not buy. When zoomed out to 17mm, the rear element of this lens can block the return path of your camera's mirror! I did this a couple times on my D750 before I realized what was happening.What I observed was that aft er taking a shot, the mirror would get stuck in the up position. The only thing that would bring it back down is to zoom in a little bit. It doesn't seem to have damaged the mirror yet, but I'm sure not going to keep trying.I did test this on a F100 as well, and there was no problem, so whether you'll have this problem depends on your camera. 1I am happy with this lens Bought this lenses to replace a broken Nikon 16-35, cost of Nikon is 2x plus, works as expected in both d750 and d850 ,some reviews say it is not sharp , I am happy with this matter , and it is my opinion for wide lens to be sharp in long landscape pictures you must use tripod !!! , low distortion , adobe Lightroom has this lens on it's profile, if you like corrections (but not needed most of the time), Spend one weekend using only this lens, great wide long pictures 1/125s f8 on a tripod, great close shots at f/4 (like the dog), great hand held long shots 1/250s ,acceptable vignette, good size and weight, did not use it indoor with a flash. 5A Very Reasonable Lens Before purchasing this lens, I'd been searching for a reasonable ultra-wide-angle lens for my D800. This was among 4 or 5 options in consideration. I love my Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 Pro DX Digital Zoom Lens - Nikon for DX, and had wanted an equivalent lens for full frame.This is my third Tokina lens, behind the 11-16mm f/2.8 and 100mm macro. I'd been satisfied with those two, and so decided to give this lens a try.First off, mechanics:The build quality is typical of Tokina; that is to say: very good. It feels perfectly solid in the hands, and I doubt anyone would complain about the quality of the construction. One thing that I'd noticed, however, is that the zoom and focus rings are a bit more loose than the 11-16mm. This perhaps makes the lens a bit more usable, but at the same time gives it a different feel than I'm used to.The focus and zoom rings are spaced well, and allow for easy manual focus. One thing to note: when changing the clutch from AF to MF, or vice versa, the focus setting can change slightly. This can sometimes be obnoxious, though it will not matter for most use.Despite, on paper, only being slightly larger than the 11-16mm, make no mistake, this is a larger lens. It is just generally bigger in all regards. Despite being fairly large, it 'looks' like an appropriate size on the D800. The 82mm filter thread is annoying, but it is better than none at all. Anything other than a UV filter at this size can be a bit pricey.Second, optics:I've not had as much chance as I'd like to to 'real world' testing, so most of these findings are based off of test-type environments. I understand that this lens seems to have a moderately-high variance in quality (based on internet searching), so I can't generalize beyond my copy:In the center, it seems to be sharp at all settings. Wide open is definitely less sharp than f/5.6 and beyond, but still not bad at all.Towards the moderate corners, it is fairly sharp wide open, and plenty sharp from f/5.6 onward. Seems to be better at the wider focal lengths.The extreme corners are somewhat disappointing. Wide open, they are not sharp. They don't become sharp until around f/8, and even then, not ideally so. Here, ~20mm seems to be the most sharp setting.In general, the sharpness does not seem to be limited by resolution so much as it is by contrast. I think that it can resolve very well, but wide open it has a bit of 'haziness' about it.Flare: at its worst when a bright object is just out of frame, which causes a low contrast veil. When the bright object is in frame, it copes with the flare better.Distortion: Almost none, and looks easy to correct.Bokeh: Very good actually. Certainly the best I've seen in the several UWA lenses I've owned.Overall and conclusion:If you treat it as a constant f/5.6 lens, you will certainly not be disappointed. For me, this is quite fine, as I likely won't shoot it much below f/8. Alternatively, if you crop away the most extreme bits of the corners, you'll be perfectly happy too. (I can see myself using 5:4 aspect ratios more commonly with this lens.)In general, this lens has exceptional build, and very good, though not exceptional, optics. Is it an 11-16mm for full frame? Not really. Is it worth the money? I'd say so. 5Nice lens, Ive used tokina 11-16 and nikon 12-24 ... Nice lens, Ive used tokina 11-16 and nikon 12-24 on my nikon D7100, and nikon 14-24 and this lens (tokina 18-35) on my nikon D750. The tokina 18-35 has the least amount of distortion of any wide angle ive ever used. 5A great lens, great price, great build quality, extermely protable.... If you're after a ultra-wide angle full frame lens for good value this is the lend to get. I've tried the Nikon 16-35 VR and can honestly say there is little noticeable difference, yes the Nikon is a little sharper, but in a day an age where most every image is either reworked or FaceBooked the price really doesn't justify the additional spend, although the VR on the Nikon is pretty sweet. With that said though the Tokina is an excellent lens, great value for money, a great size and portable unlike the massive alternatives from Nikon.I am a casual landscape and wide angle user, I own a Nikon D750, so this lens is really the prefect lens for me, great price, excellent build, extremely portable. Highly recommended..... 4Worth every penny! I bought this specifically to do real-estate and events (I hate events so I refused to buy a 24-70). It is very sharp for those purposes and vary much rivals the nikon and canon equivalents for 1/3rd the price. Distortion is hardly a problem, which is not true for my other Nikon option. I will say it has some pretty obvious chromatic aberration but that's easily fixed on lightroom, photoshop, aperture, etc.All my money goes into prime and tilt/shift lenses so if you're anything like me, and only really need this lens for a specific niche, you can easily look past the very few flaws this lens has for the price! 4Wow, value, durability Man, I'm writing this review several years after I bought it, and all I can say is: Wow, Value, Durability.It's not the best lens out there, but for the budget, traveling photographer, videographer, vlogger, adventurer, this has proven to be a workhorse that rarely comes off the camera. I use it with a Nikon D3s and a Panasonic GH4 on a daily basis. It has been dropped, submerged, rained on, caked in mud, dragged through dusty, grimy 3rd world countries, and abused daily.Optically it's not as good as the magical Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, but IMO it's a much better value since you can buy 3 of these for the price of one nikon. On the GH4 of course, I suggest the use of the Metabones Nikon G to Micro Four Thirds XL 0.64x Speed Booster. 5Not bad. My particular copy of this lens is pretty decent on my D810. More than sharp enough for what I need, but probably not the best. Compared to the Nikon equivalents I rented, there's very little distortion.Build quality is pretty solid, and how easily this thing switches from AF/MF is pretty nice. I was considering getting the newer F2.8 version, but not being able to at least use a protective UV filter kept me from going that route, since the lens is going to find itself in some less than ideal locations. 4
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Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Description
  • This version is intended for sale within the USA, 3 Year Limited Tokina Warranty
  • Fits Nikon DX Cameras 18-42mm Equivalency in 35mm Format
  • AF/MF Clutch Mechanism Molded Glass Aspherical Lens Elements
  • Ultra-Low Dispersion Glass
Reviews

Customer Reviews

I'm very happy with the performance of this lens at 17mm I'm very happy with the performance of this lens at 17mm. It really put a new perspective into my pictures. 5A practical review - this fills a much needed void in the wide-angle game. This review is based on practical application and it's ability to fit a specific need. Look elsewhere if you want a technical review of sharpness, light transmission, aberration, vignetting, blah blah blah.If you're looking at this lens, you're probably in the same position I was in not long ago and wrestling with the same tough decision. You have a full frame camera. You probably bought it not long ago. You've already bought solid f/4 or f/2.8 tele zoom and normal zoom lenses. Now you're looking to round out the package with a wide-angle zoom but you don't have an unlimited budget.The options I considered were several. Below is a list of reasons why I did not choose these lenses. They all have their strengths and, to the right person, warrant the purchase over this Tokina 17-35. I knew my intended use, how much I'd use it, and minimum requirements. This definitely helped in making my final decision. Your needs (and budget) may be different and this is only my opinion. That said:Nikon 14-24 f/2.8 - Too expensive, limited zoomNikon 16-35 f/4 - Too expensive (very close 2nd)Nikon 17-35 f/2.8 - Still a little pricey, used market only, quite heavyNikon 18-35 f/3.5-4.5 - Still expensive for what you get, lower build quality, not constant aperture, 18mm isn't wide enoughTokina 16-28 f/2.8 - Does not allow use of filters, 28mm is a little too shortThose are the lenses I juggled with in my head. There are other wide zooms out there but experience has taught me to stick with Nikon or Tokina glass. However, I've read a few reports that Tamron and Sigma quality control is on the rise.The Nikon 16-35 f/4 was the closest contender for me. I like to do car photography with the camera suspended from a rig attached to the car for motion blur effects. The Nikon is the only lens of the bunch to have Vibration Reduction and when you have a camera on the end of a long pole you are bound to get vibration. This also uses a 77mm filter thread which is a lot more convenient (and cheaper) than 82mm options. These shots require 1-2 second shutter speeds so being able to attach an ND filter is essential to me. *If I had a the extra $400-$500 to spend, I would choose the Nikon 16-35 f/4*After about two months of using this lens, I am mostly happy with my decision. The focal length is perfect. I occasionally shoot weddings and the extra reach up to 35mm makes the job easier. F/4 is sufficiently fast and the added bulk of the f/2.8 lenses isn't worth a single stop in my opinion. Tokina build quality is always outstanding and certainly on par with Nikon's best zooms. What I do not like is the huge 82mm filter thread and the focus clutch that all Tokina lenses use. 82mm filters are very expensive. The funky on/off system of the focus clutch isn't that big of a deal, but for this level of lens I would've liked the newer clutch style with full time manual focus override.So, as you can see, my decision had nothing to do with which lens was sharper than the other. In practice, ALL of these lenses will deliver totally acceptable sharpness. If you require the absolute sharpest wide-angle lens available, then move on and start looking at prime lenses. 4DANGEROUS to your camera. Do not buy. When zoomed out to 17mm, the rear element of this lens can block the return path of your camera's mirror! I did this a couple times on my D750 before I realized what was happening.What I observed was that aft er taking a shot, the mirror would get stuck in the up position. The only thing that would bring it back down is to zoom in a little bit. It doesn't seem to have damaged the mirror yet, but I'm sure not going to keep trying.I did test this on a F100 as well, and there was no problem, so whether you'll have this problem depends on your camera. 1I am happy with this lens Bought this lenses to replace a broken Nikon 16-35, cost of Nikon is 2x plus, works as expected in both d750 and d850 ,some reviews say it is not sharp , I am happy with this matter , and it is my opinion for wide lens to be sharp in long landscape pictures you must use tripod !!! , low distortion , adobe Lightroom has this lens on it's profile, if you like corrections (but not needed most of the time), Spend one weekend using only this lens, great wide long pictures 1/125s f8 on a tripod, great close shots at f/4 (like the dog), great hand held long shots 1/250s ,acceptable vignette, good size and weight, did not use it indoor with a flash. 5A Very Reasonable Lens Before purchasing this lens, I'd been searching for a reasonable ultra-wide-angle lens for my D800. This was among 4 or 5 options in consideration. I love my Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 Pro DX Digital Zoom Lens - Nikon for DX, and had wanted an equivalent lens for full frame.This is my third Tokina lens, behind the 11-16mm f/2.8 and 100mm macro. I'd been satisfied with those two, and so decided to give this lens a try.First off, mechanics:The build quality is typical of Tokina; that is to say: very good. It feels perfectly solid in the hands, and I doubt anyone would complain about the quality of the construction. One thing that I'd noticed, however, is that the zoom and focus rings are a bit more loose than the 11-16mm. This perhaps makes the lens a bit more usable, but at the same time gives it a different feel than I'm used to.The focus and zoom rings are spaced well, and allow for easy manual focus. One thing to note: when changing the clutch from AF to MF, or vice versa, the focus setting can change slightly. This can sometimes be obnoxious, though it will not matter for most use.Despite, on paper, only being slightly larger than the 11-16mm, make no mistake, this is a larger lens. It is just generally bigger in all regards. Despite being fairly large, it 'looks' like an appropriate size on the D800. The 82mm filter thread is annoying, but it is better than none at all. Anything other than a UV filter at this size can be a bit pricey.Second, optics:I've not had as much chance as I'd like to to 'real world' testing, so most of these findings are based off of test-type environments. I understand that this lens seems to have a moderately-high variance in quality (based on internet searching), so I can't generalize beyond my copy:In the center, it seems to be sharp at all settings. Wide open is definitely less sharp than f/5.6 and beyond, but still not bad at all.Towards the moderate corners, it is fairly sharp wide open, and plenty sharp from f/5.6 onward. Seems to be better at the wider focal lengths.The extreme corners are somewhat disappointing. Wide open, they are not sharp. They don't become sharp until around f/8, and even then, not ideally so. Here, ~20mm seems to be the most sharp setting.In general, the sharpness does not seem to be limited by resolution so much as it is by contrast. I think that it can resolve very well, but wide open it has a bit of 'haziness' about it.Flare: at its worst when a bright object is just out of frame, which causes a low contrast veil. When the bright object is in frame, it copes with the flare better.Distortion: Almost none, and looks easy to correct.Bokeh: Very good actually. Certainly the best I've seen in the several UWA lenses I've owned.Overall and conclusion:If you treat it as a constant f/5.6 lens, you will certainly not be disappointed. For me, this is quite fine, as I likely won't shoot it much below f/8. Alternatively, if you crop away the most extreme bits of the corners, you'll be perfectly happy too. (I can see myself using 5:4 aspect ratios more commonly with this lens.)In general, this lens has exceptional build, and very good, though not exceptional, optics. Is it an 11-16mm for full frame? Not really. Is it worth the money? I'd say so. 5Nice lens, Ive used tokina 11-16 and nikon 12-24 ... Nice lens, Ive used tokina 11-16 and nikon 12-24 on my nikon D7100, and nikon 14-24 and this lens (tokina 18-35) on my nikon D750. The tokina 18-35 has the least amount of distortion of any wide angle ive ever used. 5A great lens, great price, great build quality, extermely protable.... If you're after a ultra-wide angle full frame lens for good value this is the lend to get. I've tried the Nikon 16-35 VR and can honestly say there is little noticeable difference, yes the Nikon is a little sharper, but in a day an age where most every image is either reworked or FaceBooked the price really doesn't justify the additional spend, although the VR on the Nikon is pretty sweet. With that said though the Tokina is an excellent lens, great value for money, a great size and portable unlike the massive alternatives from Nikon.I am a casual landscape and wide angle user, I own a Nikon D750, so this lens is really the prefect lens for me, great price, excellent build, extremely portable. Highly recommended..... 4Worth every penny! I bought this specifically to do real-estate and events (I hate events so I refused to buy a 24-70). It is very sharp for those purposes and vary much rivals the nikon and canon equivalents for 1/3rd the price. Distortion is hardly a problem, which is not true for my other Nikon option. I will say it has some pretty obvious chromatic aberration but that's easily fixed on lightroom, photoshop, aperture, etc.All my money goes into prime and tilt/shift lenses so if you're anything like me, and only really need this lens for a specific niche, you can easily look past the very few flaws this lens has for the price! 4Wow, value, durability Man, I'm writing this review several years after I bought it, and all I can say is: Wow, Value, Durability.It's not the best lens out there, but for the budget, traveling photographer, videographer, vlogger, adventurer, this has proven to be a workhorse that rarely comes off the camera. I use it with a Nikon D3s and a Panasonic GH4 on a daily basis. It has been dropped, submerged, rained on, caked in mud, dragged through dusty, grimy 3rd world countries, and abused daily.Optically it's not as good as the magical Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8G ED, but IMO it's a much better value since you can buy 3 of these for the price of one nikon. On the GH4 of course, I suggest the use of the Metabones Nikon G to Micro Four Thirds XL 0.64x Speed Booster. 5Not bad. My particular copy of this lens is pretty decent on my D810. More than sharp enough for what I need, but probably not the best. Compared to the Nikon equivalents I rented, there's very little distortion.Build quality is pretty solid, and how easily this thing switches from AF/MF is pretty nice. I was considering getting the newer F2.8 version, but not being able to at least use a protective UV filter kept me from going that route, since the lens is going to find itself in some less than ideal locations. 4
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Return And Refund Policy
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Delivery Policy
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.

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