• Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
  • Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
  • Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
  • Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White
Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite   Wireless Access Point   802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White

Ubiquiti Unifi Ap Ac Lite Wireless Access Point 802.11 B/A/G/N/Ac (Uapacliteus), White

SKU:HA5PR20GY
Sale price
£117.00
Regular price
£194.00
Unit price
per 
( 39% off )
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Expected Delivery: 21-28 days

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  • 2.4 and 5 GHz coverage in an ultra-compact design
  • (1) 10/100/1000 Ethernet
  • 24V passive Poe
  • Dimensions: 160 x 31.45 mm

Customer Reviews

This AP appears to be a great device I had trouble installing and running the Controller software on my Windows 10 PC and Edge. After I finally made a connection to the AP, then everything else was simple and painless. This AP appears to be a great device and only time will tell for sure. Had the Controller software been cleaner for Edge then I would have given this 5 stars.Update 1/9/2018: Spent several hours trying to determine why AP failed due to radios being "disabled". Found out that there is no Ubiquiti phone support and had to rely on Google search but nothing readily apparent that could be done. Reset, re-provisioned, upgraded firmware, etc. to no avail. Suddenly the AP started working again for no apparent reason. Deduct one star.Update 1/13/2018: The AP has been rock solid. I applied a "rolling update" via the Controller software without issues.Update 1/22/2018: Adding 1 star back since I've found out the Controller software has a "Chat" support feature, although I've not tried it, should have minimized my installation frustration that I experienced initially. Also I'm becoming aware of the many, many other features this software provides. The device remains working rock solid. 4Couldn't be more satisfied with this upgrade. We recently got an upgrade to our internet from 60/8 to 100/10, and our Ubiquiti UAP couldn't support those speeds for our laptops and other wireless devices. At most, we were consistently getting between 30-45Mbps, so this was not acceptable for us anymore. We upgraded to the UAP-AC-Lite and couldn't be more satisfied.Not only is it almost half the size of the UAP, on just the regular default settings our devices are now consistently getting between 65-85Mbps thanks to the 5Ghz antenna. Devices on the 2.4Ghz didn't see much improvement at all such as my cellphone, but our laptops which are more important have definitely seen a huge improvement, but maybe with some settings tinkering I might be able to improve it a little more.For $80, this was a very decent purchase. However, before purchasing, I would encourage you to ensure that your wireless devices are 5Ghz compatible as this is probably where your speed boost will come from, otherwise I fear you may set yourself up for disappointment. Also keep in mind that 5Ghz has a smaller radius and won't reach as far as the 2.4Ghz channel.EDITED 5/18/18Just making you all aware that I've since made a minor tweak in my settings since our devices weren't quite getting the full speeds, even though it did improve. I ended up creating a separate Wifi login dedicated just to 5Ghz so ensure devices that supported it were connected and now our devices (laptops and cellphones) consistently hit 100+ mbps. Just what the doctor ordered.EDITED 11/11/18Wanted to mention as well that we've since upgraded to 200mbps internet and my cellphone consistently gets 200+ mbps when running the Speedtest app. Just make sure you're on the 5Ghz network and not the 2.4Ghz. 5Hard to believe how powerful it is This solved a problem for me. I live in an older home here in south Louisiana. The builder "hardened" it against hurricanes by sheathing all interior walls with plywood on both sides. That's great for quiet and strength. Not so much for running cable drops and less so for wifi.Worse, I'm too far from anything for cable / dsl / whatever, so I receive my internet connection through my company's service, which is repeated by microwave on its way to a remote building we support. I have a yagi antenna hooked to a Linksys WRT54G router to receive signal from the repeater. That may not be much, using a G router, but the max I can receive is 25 Mbps, so this is plenty and that router is a tank. It's also already in place, and wired to my Tivo Bolt and Yamaha AVR through a switch, and also to my home network via some TP-Link home powerline adapters (which I highly recommend).Anyway, the house is big and has a hallway bisecting it that is about 35 feet long. So I put this Unifi in the hall ceiling, ran an RG6 drop to the Linksys, and configured it. It took longer to run the cable than to configure, once I downloaded the firmware upgrade and the installation software.The product didn't ship with software but Ubiquiti updates a LOT (a good thing if you ask me), so I'm sure I'd have had to update anyway. The Unifi-installer is about 160 megs, and the firmware was small enough to not matter. A word here: it will require Java to run the installer, so you may want to be sure you have it on your PC before you start. At least, that's the case with Windows 7 64 bit OS.So this is running in my house as of this morning and it's blasting 15 Mbps around the entire house. Yes, yes, I know. Blasting? That's not even LTE speeds but for me, having survived a meager existence, eking out about 1/3 that most days and in the back of the house, nothing, this is a major improvement. It is the difference between streaming Netflix and Prime and NOT streaming in my bedroom.Setting aside speed for a moment and considering signal strength, it is nothing short of amazing. This product is sending a signal the same strength throughout this house - regardless of how many walls it has to penetrate. This means that in a 3,000 square foot, 5 bedroom house, I only need this one device in my hall, where before I was juggling a couple of "legacy" routers and dealing with all kinds of downtime and latency issues.So to the hardware and so on. This is a small device, about 7 inches in diameter and very discreet in a matte finish. It is mounted on either ceiling or wall, and there is the hardware to allow for either. Mounting is a snap. Four screws and drill a hole for your cable. Once it's mounted and cable inserted, it's hooked on the other end to your POE adapter and in my case, router. When it is seeing the network, there is a blue ring about 3" in diameter in center of the device. It's a status indicator and a nifty night light for my hall too.Sorry to gush but this is a really good product. It's not for a person who wants plug and play. You have to poke around under the hood a bit but if you are willing to do that, you'll find this to be an excellent product. 5High power. Commercial quality. I've been using Ubiquiti for many years and several models. I've purchased these for my companies lab network and referred several commercial friends to Ubiquiti WAPs.Your bang for your buck is unmatched with Ubiquiti products.The Long Range versions of Ubiquiti have amazing range.In large indoor settings, Ubiquiti WAPs can present themselves as a single access point. Devices will connect to the strongest (probably nearest) access point.ONE THING to know BEFORE you buy Ubiquiti: you do not manage the devices by simply connecting directly to them (e.g. with a web browser pointed to 192.168.0.1). You must download and install a small utility to manage your access point(s). Oddly, this requires Python to be installed and also you be logged in as an Administrator. This is a slight nuisance, but totally understandable when you consider the mesh capabilities and power of what you are administering. Also, you set up the network once and then let it run forever. So it's not like you have to constantly log into the system.Administration Note: the Ubiquiti forums are alight with people confused about the device password and the control panel password. The devices share a default username and password. In the "Control Panel" software you set your own system-wide administration password. After your "provision" an access point into the control panel, it takes on the administration password. 5Rock Solid after a few struggles I installed this in my parents house, hoping to cut down on the number of "service calls" I had to make when their el-cheapo wireless router decided to take the day off. It has been installed for a couple months now, and uptime has been 100%, with no glitches, crashes, or problems. From that standpoint, it was a success and well worth the price.=== The Good Stuff ===* As mentioned above, from the time it was installed, it has been rock solid. The modem, router and WAP are all on a UPS, so even power outages haven't caused any problems. The one time that Comcast internet was interrupted, a quick power cycle of the router brought the whole network, including this WAP, back online instantly.* The styling is nice, especially the feature that allows you to turn off the status light. The ceiling mount allows the router to be stashed out of the way, and there are no unsightly antennae cluttering up the room.* With plain old Comcast internet, the speed through this device was about the same as with a wired connection to the router. (Sorry, lost the scrap of paper I wrote the actual numbers on).=== The Not-So-Good Stuff ===* There are about 8 ways to mount the bracket into the ceiling and orient the ethernet cable. I tried 7 wrong ways before I got the right one. Its obvious once you do it, but easy enough to screw up. The directions aren't much help-a template would have been great.* The setup went well- the first time. I tried the WAP out sitting right next to the router. When I moved it to the ceiling, it would take all sorts of reboots and power cycles to finally get the thing to connect up. The supplied software is a bit obscure about what it actually happening, and I cried uncle and tried tech support. The tech support guy took local control of my computer, and promptly wiped out my router configuration. After fighting with that for a hour, I tracked the problem to a flaky cable-which somehow allowed me to execute a DoS attack on my own router. After replacing the cable, all went smooth.=== Summary ===If you do everything right, this is a piece of cake to install and configure. If you have problems-well-you will learn something about the IP protocol. Once it is alive, it is rock-solid.=== Update 5/23/17 ===The WAP has been up for over 6 months with exactly 0 calls for service. If only every internet high tech thing worked this well. 4Excellently works and nicely looking too First, I did receive the newer version which supports the 802.3af/A PoE. The blue triangle at the corner on the box indicates it's a newer version. This was not important to me since I would use the passive PoE included in the kit anyway. The 802.3af/A feature may be important for some people who use their own PoE.It took me about an hour to set up since I already ran the Ethernet cable to my ceiling before I received the item. I downloaded the program, updated the firmware, and had it running right away. I needed to figure out how to set up two different SSIDs for 5GHz and 2.4 GHz since my security cameras only work on 2.4 GHz band. I couldn't figure it out how to do it. Within the program there is a Chat function. I clicked on it and a customer rep came on right away. He/she provided me the instructions on how to set up two SSIDs for the 5 and 2.4 GHz (go to device>>>AP>>>properties>>>config>>>WLAN)As a bonus, we really like the lighted blue ring in the ceiling. Wifi has been working great so far. It's been only two days so hope it will last a long time 5This access point is great. It provides full coverage with little reduction in ... This access point is great. It provides full coverage with little reduction in speed across my 2-story 2,500sqft home. It provides coverage both in the backyard and front yard as well. We have 15+ wifi connections at any given time including 2x Nest cams, 2x Nest Protects, ecobee thermostat, smart TVs, PS4, ipads and cell phones, laptops, WeMo wifi switches, Rachio irrigation control, and more and it never slows down. The 5Ghz band even penetrates a few of my walls and works in most of the house as well.The setup was very simple via the Android app using the QR code scanner and took a matter of minutes. I chose not to utilize the controller software and have had no issues with stability or connections. The app provides insight into which devices are connected and allows you to block devices as well. It allows for basic configuration of the SSID, password, broadcast strength, channel, and a few other items.It's a small device that fits in the palm of your hand. The wall mount is very simple to use and has two arrows (one on the top of the access point and one on the wall mount) that help you line up the two and easily twist/snap it into place. Removal is simple as well with a small flat head screw driver to unlock it and allow for you to twist it off.Overall, highly recommended, easy to use, stable, and good looking. 5Unifi Overview There are several models of the UniFi line of wireless access points (WAP or AP). The Amazon descriptions don't tell you everything so this review is intended to give an overview of the product line. These devices are made by Ubiquiti, a company mostly known for supplying wireless gear to the networking professional. Because of remarkably low pricing, high reliability, and marketing via consumer outlets such as Amazon, more and more folks are getting turned onto Ubiquiti gear. Although Ubiquiti has a track record of promising, and even advertising, features that materialize either late or never, UniFi still gives you great bang for the buck. :>Be advised that you need to be tech savvy to configure Ubiquiti products. They don't have push-button setup and there is no telephone support. Most configuration questions are handled through the community forums. I'm going to tell you right now though that if you don't have some networking background the forums may put you off. It's frequented by folks who install UniFi for a living and they speak in techno-talk. No real hand-holding but rather, practical advice from people who do UniFi every day and speak the lingo of WiFi and RF (Radio Frequency). Having said that, if you are the Power User and learning/researching type you may get along with UniFi quite nicely.Let's move on and point out the main features of UniFi. UniFi access points are often deployed as part of a "managed WiFi system", i.e. hotspot software (although a UniFi system can be a single access point). UniFi is often used in the hospitality industry where something more than a WiFi password scratched on a piece of paper is required. With UniFi you can set up a customized guest portal, place speed and/or data caps on each client's internet usage, track who is connected to your system, cut off usage hogs, and even charge a fee for access. UniFi even lets you print out uniquely numbered guest vouchers as opposed to handing out a single password for everyone. These features are all optional.UniFi requires a program called the UniFi "controller". The controller must be run when first setting up the system in order to "adopt" each AP. After that the controller is required to be running 24/7 only if you wish to use the guest portal function. The controller can run on a local computer (PC, MAC, Linux box) or in an Amazon cloud. Ubiquiti has even released a small form factor product called "Cloud Key" that is sort of a hybrid gadget that is plugged into an open Ethernet port, but can be managed from the cloud (however at the time of this writing the Cloud Key firmware is still labeled less than version 1. Caution is advised).Regarding the various UniFi AP hardware, they come in indoor or outdoor versions, 2.4GHz or 5GHz versions, and there is a model (both indoor and outdoor) that incorporates both 2.4 & 5GHz radios. UniFi devices operate as wireless access points only, meaning they deliver internet to connected client devices such as laptops and smartphones. If you are instead setting up a system to connect to an existing access point, or to make a point-to-point link, you should check out a cousin to the UniFi outdoor models designated as "Rocket" (Ubiquiti ROCKETM2 2.4GHz Hi Power 2x2 MIMO AirMax TDMA BaseStation), which has upgradeable antennas, or the Rocket s [somewhat] equivalent with a fixed directional antenna, the NanoStation series (Ubiquiti NanoStation locoM2 2.4GHz Indoor/Outdoor airMax 8dBi CPE).OUTDOOR UNIFI MODELSUniFi AP Outdoor 2.4GHz (Ubiquiti UniFI AP Outdoor 2x2 MIMO Access Point 802.11bgn).It's 2.4GHz only, but that will be most compatible with an array of wireless devices. 2x2 MIMO means up to 300Mb/s throughput.UniFi AP Outdoor 5GHz (Ubiquiti Networks Unifi AP Outdoor 5GHz (UAP-OUTDOOR-5)).Also 2x2 MIMO. Great in areas densely populated with 2.4GHz signals, but you must insure that all devices wanting to connect have 5GHz capability.NOTE: Unique to the above models are detachable antennas. The provided omni-directional antennas give these radios good range in all directions. However if you need even more distance, or coverage only in specific areas Ubiquiti has an amazing line of high gain directional antennas designed specifically for these Outdoor APs. For example, I have an installation where the client devices are over 500 ft. from the UniFi Outdoor 2.4GHz AP (it's a motel) and my customer never gets complaints about weak WiFi signals. We are running an airMAX 120 degree Sector Antenna (Ubiquiti Airmax 2.4GHz 15dBi 120 degree Sector Antenna). A well designed antenna like this makes the AP a very good *listener*, allowing it to receive the relatively weak signals generated by most consumer handheld devices. Without a proper antenna the AP can put out all the power in the world, but users won't get a good connection at such distances because their [relatively weak] signal has trouble making it back to the AP. By the way, the Outdoor UniFi AP is designed to fit snugly into the airMAX antenna, providing a clean and attractive installation.UniFi AP AC Outdoor (Ubiquiti Networks UniFi UAP-AC Outdoor Enterprise WiFi System).Incorporates both 2.4 and 5GHz radios. Best of both worlds, but cost is substantially higher and the omni antennas are fixed. This "AC" model is 3x3 MIMO with throughput up to 450Mb/s. Fixed antennas.Indoor UniFi models come in several flavors, but they tend to match the specs of the outdoor models. Most come in an attractive round smoke detector form factor with fixed antennas. The best way to see the lineup is to go to the Ubiquiti product page here: ubnt dot com /products/#all/wireless. I tend to skip any versions with LR (long range) in the model number. Experience indicates that it is preferable to have a greater number of medium range APs indoors as opposed to a smaller number of high-powered APs. Again, the AP must be able to receive a signal from lower powered client devices.Finally, when purchasing a UniFi AP be advised that there are two generations of the APs. The second generation have "AC" in the model name and are capable of higher speeds. They AC models have been a bit problematic so be sure to download the latest firmware for the model you purchase.Hope this helps! 4I have grown to love Ubiquiti Unifi I have grown to love Ubiquiti Unifi. The USG combined with a Unifi managed switch and AP; the total price was actually less than flagship routers from Asus and the like. This setup blows them away. No one in my family has complained once about unreliable wifi since I switched months ago. I had a virtualized pfSense machine to route traffic but the Unifi USG integrated so well, and the Controller software has added many firewall-type features to the USG over the last year and a half or so. Unifi had a great app for mobile devices, too, to manage controllers and sites as well.One negative I've noticed is temperature. These devices get hot. I grabbed a 15$ USB powered fan to get some active cooling going on. Without the fan, days over 80 degrees would make the usg and switch especially go over what felt like 150 degrees F. I could barely touch them they'd get so hot. A 80 mm USB fan meant for living room entertainment cabinets did the trick.I'm trying to get my family to convert to Unifi So I can throw them all on my Ubuntu controller host and manage them all from anywhere. 5half of a good replacement for Tomato wifi/router (and at same cost) This Unifi AP-AC Lite was purchased in tandem with an Edgerouter X to replace an ASUS N16 that had been running Shibby Tomato.The combination cost about the same as a mid-range wifi router (about $150). Configuration is more involved, but much finer grained control of wifi (and routing, but not part of this review) is possible.REPLACING TOMATOThe Tomato open source community has been a great resource for a decade, and it's been a stable platform for routers starting with the Linksys WRT54GL on through to ASUS 802.11AC devices. Unforutnately, some newer consumer wifi products have closed firmware that makes Tomato more difficult for developers to maintain. Other devices now lock down the bootloader or use non-Broadcom hardware, which make open source less feasible.Ubiquiti devices require OEM software (as far as I know), which is no different from a closed router. Unlike consumer routers, the administration interface gives full control of the device through the command line. The slightly higher level of IT skill required for Ubiquiti gear has yielded a large and large and active user community online where answers to most configuration and operational issues can be found from other users or Ubiquiti staff. My experience with consumer devices is that vendor support dries up fairly quickly once the device is discontinued. It appears that Ubiquiti continues to support its older devices. Updates are discussed openly by the manufacturer on the forums and arrive in timely fashion. When a PHP vulnerability from very old code was identified, the manufacturer responded quickly to patch it and push out an update.The basic set up wizard gets you off the ground easily, as long as you're kind of person who knows the difference between 192.168.1.0 and 12.140.132.0. (hint: one's private and one's public). Actually, you probably don't need to know that, just basic familiarly with screen wizards, accessing IP addresses from browser.Keep in mind this device is an access point only. It does not handle routing tasks that are native to the consumer wifi units with separate WAN and LAN ports. As such, the UniFi has just one port, for Ethernet. Power comes through the Ethernet connection, sourced either from a Power Over Ethernet capable switch or router at the other end, or from the power injector included with single-unit packages. Note that not all POE supplies are created equal; what an older or different branded switch provides in voltage and power may differ from the UniFi's requirements. I did not research this deeply as I simply used the included power injector.I will continue to use Tomato on devices where it's stable and supported. The ASUS RT-N12, for example, works well as an access point and router if 100Mhz LAN and 2.4 Ghz wifi is sufficient (and when the N16 failed, I found that both Netflix and Chromecast were perfectly happy with this $30 router). But for getting the most out of a high speed connection, particularly with respect to latency, more horsepower is needed. Ubiquiti's gear is giving me that, even at its least expensive level.PERFORMANCERange is greatly improved over all the Netgear and Asus devices I've had in its place. Latency is also improved. DHCP connections, particularly to Android devices, happen more quickly.Physically, this particular unit sits inconspicuously atop a row of books high up on built in shelf, connected by one flat Cat 6 Ethernet ribbon cable. Another Cat 6 connection runs between the PoE injector and the router. The PoE can be located anywhere between the switch port and the UniFi. This means the UniFi can be set up without a nearby power outlet.The UniFi allows multiple SSIDs and VLANs. There is a radio scanner that provides an intuitive and useful graphical display of deployed channels and interference (and a visualization of why 40 Mhz 2.4 Ghz channels are a bad idea in a crowded environment). The user interface is sophisticated and stable. The control interface requires a locally installed program (the "UniFi Controller" that then will use a native browser session for display.WIth the Edgerouter (or any other router), some of the reporting features such as historical latency and throughput charts are not available unless a "UniFi Security Gateway" is connected. I chose to forgo that device in favor of the Edgerouter X, which was less expensive, had more available wired ports, and all the capability I need for my setup. 5
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Description
  • 2.4 and 5 GHz coverage in an ultra-compact design
  • (1) 10/100/1000 Ethernet
  • 24V passive Poe
  • Dimensions: 160 x 31.45 mm
Reviews

Customer Reviews

This AP appears to be a great device I had trouble installing and running the Controller software on my Windows 10 PC and Edge. After I finally made a connection to the AP, then everything else was simple and painless. This AP appears to be a great device and only time will tell for sure. Had the Controller software been cleaner for Edge then I would have given this 5 stars.Update 1/9/2018: Spent several hours trying to determine why AP failed due to radios being "disabled". Found out that there is no Ubiquiti phone support and had to rely on Google search but nothing readily apparent that could be done. Reset, re-provisioned, upgraded firmware, etc. to no avail. Suddenly the AP started working again for no apparent reason. Deduct one star.Update 1/13/2018: The AP has been rock solid. I applied a "rolling update" via the Controller software without issues.Update 1/22/2018: Adding 1 star back since I've found out the Controller software has a "Chat" support feature, although I've not tried it, should have minimized my installation frustration that I experienced initially. Also I'm becoming aware of the many, many other features this software provides. The device remains working rock solid. 4Couldn't be more satisfied with this upgrade. We recently got an upgrade to our internet from 60/8 to 100/10, and our Ubiquiti UAP couldn't support those speeds for our laptops and other wireless devices. At most, we were consistently getting between 30-45Mbps, so this was not acceptable for us anymore. We upgraded to the UAP-AC-Lite and couldn't be more satisfied.Not only is it almost half the size of the UAP, on just the regular default settings our devices are now consistently getting between 65-85Mbps thanks to the 5Ghz antenna. Devices on the 2.4Ghz didn't see much improvement at all such as my cellphone, but our laptops which are more important have definitely seen a huge improvement, but maybe with some settings tinkering I might be able to improve it a little more.For $80, this was a very decent purchase. However, before purchasing, I would encourage you to ensure that your wireless devices are 5Ghz compatible as this is probably where your speed boost will come from, otherwise I fear you may set yourself up for disappointment. Also keep in mind that 5Ghz has a smaller radius and won't reach as far as the 2.4Ghz channel.EDITED 5/18/18Just making you all aware that I've since made a minor tweak in my settings since our devices weren't quite getting the full speeds, even though it did improve. I ended up creating a separate Wifi login dedicated just to 5Ghz so ensure devices that supported it were connected and now our devices (laptops and cellphones) consistently hit 100+ mbps. Just what the doctor ordered.EDITED 11/11/18Wanted to mention as well that we've since upgraded to 200mbps internet and my cellphone consistently gets 200+ mbps when running the Speedtest app. Just make sure you're on the 5Ghz network and not the 2.4Ghz. 5Hard to believe how powerful it is This solved a problem for me. I live in an older home here in south Louisiana. The builder "hardened" it against hurricanes by sheathing all interior walls with plywood on both sides. That's great for quiet and strength. Not so much for running cable drops and less so for wifi.Worse, I'm too far from anything for cable / dsl / whatever, so I receive my internet connection through my company's service, which is repeated by microwave on its way to a remote building we support. I have a yagi antenna hooked to a Linksys WRT54G router to receive signal from the repeater. That may not be much, using a G router, but the max I can receive is 25 Mbps, so this is plenty and that router is a tank. It's also already in place, and wired to my Tivo Bolt and Yamaha AVR through a switch, and also to my home network via some TP-Link home powerline adapters (which I highly recommend).Anyway, the house is big and has a hallway bisecting it that is about 35 feet long. So I put this Unifi in the hall ceiling, ran an RG6 drop to the Linksys, and configured it. It took longer to run the cable than to configure, once I downloaded the firmware upgrade and the installation software.The product didn't ship with software but Ubiquiti updates a LOT (a good thing if you ask me), so I'm sure I'd have had to update anyway. The Unifi-installer is about 160 megs, and the firmware was small enough to not matter. A word here: it will require Java to run the installer, so you may want to be sure you have it on your PC before you start. At least, that's the case with Windows 7 64 bit OS.So this is running in my house as of this morning and it's blasting 15 Mbps around the entire house. Yes, yes, I know. Blasting? That's not even LTE speeds but for me, having survived a meager existence, eking out about 1/3 that most days and in the back of the house, nothing, this is a major improvement. It is the difference between streaming Netflix and Prime and NOT streaming in my bedroom.Setting aside speed for a moment and considering signal strength, it is nothing short of amazing. This product is sending a signal the same strength throughout this house - regardless of how many walls it has to penetrate. This means that in a 3,000 square foot, 5 bedroom house, I only need this one device in my hall, where before I was juggling a couple of "legacy" routers and dealing with all kinds of downtime and latency issues.So to the hardware and so on. This is a small device, about 7 inches in diameter and very discreet in a matte finish. It is mounted on either ceiling or wall, and there is the hardware to allow for either. Mounting is a snap. Four screws and drill a hole for your cable. Once it's mounted and cable inserted, it's hooked on the other end to your POE adapter and in my case, router. When it is seeing the network, there is a blue ring about 3" in diameter in center of the device. It's a status indicator and a nifty night light for my hall too.Sorry to gush but this is a really good product. It's not for a person who wants plug and play. You have to poke around under the hood a bit but if you are willing to do that, you'll find this to be an excellent product. 5High power. Commercial quality. I've been using Ubiquiti for many years and several models. I've purchased these for my companies lab network and referred several commercial friends to Ubiquiti WAPs.Your bang for your buck is unmatched with Ubiquiti products.The Long Range versions of Ubiquiti have amazing range.In large indoor settings, Ubiquiti WAPs can present themselves as a single access point. Devices will connect to the strongest (probably nearest) access point.ONE THING to know BEFORE you buy Ubiquiti: you do not manage the devices by simply connecting directly to them (e.g. with a web browser pointed to 192.168.0.1). You must download and install a small utility to manage your access point(s). Oddly, this requires Python to be installed and also you be logged in as an Administrator. This is a slight nuisance, but totally understandable when you consider the mesh capabilities and power of what you are administering. Also, you set up the network once and then let it run forever. So it's not like you have to constantly log into the system.Administration Note: the Ubiquiti forums are alight with people confused about the device password and the control panel password. The devices share a default username and password. In the "Control Panel" software you set your own system-wide administration password. After your "provision" an access point into the control panel, it takes on the administration password. 5Rock Solid after a few struggles I installed this in my parents house, hoping to cut down on the number of "service calls" I had to make when their el-cheapo wireless router decided to take the day off. It has been installed for a couple months now, and uptime has been 100%, with no glitches, crashes, or problems. From that standpoint, it was a success and well worth the price.=== The Good Stuff ===* As mentioned above, from the time it was installed, it has been rock solid. The modem, router and WAP are all on a UPS, so even power outages haven't caused any problems. The one time that Comcast internet was interrupted, a quick power cycle of the router brought the whole network, including this WAP, back online instantly.* The styling is nice, especially the feature that allows you to turn off the status light. The ceiling mount allows the router to be stashed out of the way, and there are no unsightly antennae cluttering up the room.* With plain old Comcast internet, the speed through this device was about the same as with a wired connection to the router. (Sorry, lost the scrap of paper I wrote the actual numbers on).=== The Not-So-Good Stuff ===* There are about 8 ways to mount the bracket into the ceiling and orient the ethernet cable. I tried 7 wrong ways before I got the right one. Its obvious once you do it, but easy enough to screw up. The directions aren't much help-a template would have been great.* The setup went well- the first time. I tried the WAP out sitting right next to the router. When I moved it to the ceiling, it would take all sorts of reboots and power cycles to finally get the thing to connect up. The supplied software is a bit obscure about what it actually happening, and I cried uncle and tried tech support. The tech support guy took local control of my computer, and promptly wiped out my router configuration. After fighting with that for a hour, I tracked the problem to a flaky cable-which somehow allowed me to execute a DoS attack on my own router. After replacing the cable, all went smooth.=== Summary ===If you do everything right, this is a piece of cake to install and configure. If you have problems-well-you will learn something about the IP protocol. Once it is alive, it is rock-solid.=== Update 5/23/17 ===The WAP has been up for over 6 months with exactly 0 calls for service. If only every internet high tech thing worked this well. 4Excellently works and nicely looking too First, I did receive the newer version which supports the 802.3af/A PoE. The blue triangle at the corner on the box indicates it's a newer version. This was not important to me since I would use the passive PoE included in the kit anyway. The 802.3af/A feature may be important for some people who use their own PoE.It took me about an hour to set up since I already ran the Ethernet cable to my ceiling before I received the item. I downloaded the program, updated the firmware, and had it running right away. I needed to figure out how to set up two different SSIDs for 5GHz and 2.4 GHz since my security cameras only work on 2.4 GHz band. I couldn't figure it out how to do it. Within the program there is a Chat function. I clicked on it and a customer rep came on right away. He/she provided me the instructions on how to set up two SSIDs for the 5 and 2.4 GHz (go to device>>>AP>>>properties>>>config>>>WLAN)As a bonus, we really like the lighted blue ring in the ceiling. Wifi has been working great so far. It's been only two days so hope it will last a long time 5This access point is great. It provides full coverage with little reduction in ... This access point is great. It provides full coverage with little reduction in speed across my 2-story 2,500sqft home. It provides coverage both in the backyard and front yard as well. We have 15+ wifi connections at any given time including 2x Nest cams, 2x Nest Protects, ecobee thermostat, smart TVs, PS4, ipads and cell phones, laptops, WeMo wifi switches, Rachio irrigation control, and more and it never slows down. The 5Ghz band even penetrates a few of my walls and works in most of the house as well.The setup was very simple via the Android app using the QR code scanner and took a matter of minutes. I chose not to utilize the controller software and have had no issues with stability or connections. The app provides insight into which devices are connected and allows you to block devices as well. It allows for basic configuration of the SSID, password, broadcast strength, channel, and a few other items.It's a small device that fits in the palm of your hand. The wall mount is very simple to use and has two arrows (one on the top of the access point and one on the wall mount) that help you line up the two and easily twist/snap it into place. Removal is simple as well with a small flat head screw driver to unlock it and allow for you to twist it off.Overall, highly recommended, easy to use, stable, and good looking. 5Unifi Overview There are several models of the UniFi line of wireless access points (WAP or AP). The Amazon descriptions don't tell you everything so this review is intended to give an overview of the product line. These devices are made by Ubiquiti, a company mostly known for supplying wireless gear to the networking professional. Because of remarkably low pricing, high reliability, and marketing via consumer outlets such as Amazon, more and more folks are getting turned onto Ubiquiti gear. Although Ubiquiti has a track record of promising, and even advertising, features that materialize either late or never, UniFi still gives you great bang for the buck. :>Be advised that you need to be tech savvy to configure Ubiquiti products. They don't have push-button setup and there is no telephone support. Most configuration questions are handled through the community forums. I'm going to tell you right now though that if you don't have some networking background the forums may put you off. It's frequented by folks who install UniFi for a living and they speak in techno-talk. No real hand-holding but rather, practical advice from people who do UniFi every day and speak the lingo of WiFi and RF (Radio Frequency). Having said that, if you are the Power User and learning/researching type you may get along with UniFi quite nicely.Let's move on and point out the main features of UniFi. UniFi access points are often deployed as part of a "managed WiFi system", i.e. hotspot software (although a UniFi system can be a single access point). UniFi is often used in the hospitality industry where something more than a WiFi password scratched on a piece of paper is required. With UniFi you can set up a customized guest portal, place speed and/or data caps on each client's internet usage, track who is connected to your system, cut off usage hogs, and even charge a fee for access. UniFi even lets you print out uniquely numbered guest vouchers as opposed to handing out a single password for everyone. These features are all optional.UniFi requires a program called the UniFi "controller". The controller must be run when first setting up the system in order to "adopt" each AP. After that the controller is required to be running 24/7 only if you wish to use the guest portal function. The controller can run on a local computer (PC, MAC, Linux box) or in an Amazon cloud. Ubiquiti has even released a small form factor product called "Cloud Key" that is sort of a hybrid gadget that is plugged into an open Ethernet port, but can be managed from the cloud (however at the time of this writing the Cloud Key firmware is still labeled less than version 1. Caution is advised).Regarding the various UniFi AP hardware, they come in indoor or outdoor versions, 2.4GHz or 5GHz versions, and there is a model (both indoor and outdoor) that incorporates both 2.4 & 5GHz radios. UniFi devices operate as wireless access points only, meaning they deliver internet to connected client devices such as laptops and smartphones. If you are instead setting up a system to connect to an existing access point, or to make a point-to-point link, you should check out a cousin to the UniFi outdoor models designated as "Rocket" (Ubiquiti ROCKETM2 2.4GHz Hi Power 2x2 MIMO AirMax TDMA BaseStation), which has upgradeable antennas, or the Rocket s [somewhat] equivalent with a fixed directional antenna, the NanoStation series (Ubiquiti NanoStation locoM2 2.4GHz Indoor/Outdoor airMax 8dBi CPE).OUTDOOR UNIFI MODELSUniFi AP Outdoor 2.4GHz (Ubiquiti UniFI AP Outdoor 2x2 MIMO Access Point 802.11bgn).It's 2.4GHz only, but that will be most compatible with an array of wireless devices. 2x2 MIMO means up to 300Mb/s throughput.UniFi AP Outdoor 5GHz (Ubiquiti Networks Unifi AP Outdoor 5GHz (UAP-OUTDOOR-5)).Also 2x2 MIMO. Great in areas densely populated with 2.4GHz signals, but you must insure that all devices wanting to connect have 5GHz capability.NOTE: Unique to the above models are detachable antennas. The provided omni-directional antennas give these radios good range in all directions. However if you need even more distance, or coverage only in specific areas Ubiquiti has an amazing line of high gain directional antennas designed specifically for these Outdoor APs. For example, I have an installation where the client devices are over 500 ft. from the UniFi Outdoor 2.4GHz AP (it's a motel) and my customer never gets complaints about weak WiFi signals. We are running an airMAX 120 degree Sector Antenna (Ubiquiti Airmax 2.4GHz 15dBi 120 degree Sector Antenna). A well designed antenna like this makes the AP a very good *listener*, allowing it to receive the relatively weak signals generated by most consumer handheld devices. Without a proper antenna the AP can put out all the power in the world, but users won't get a good connection at such distances because their [relatively weak] signal has trouble making it back to the AP. By the way, the Outdoor UniFi AP is designed to fit snugly into the airMAX antenna, providing a clean and attractive installation.UniFi AP AC Outdoor (Ubiquiti Networks UniFi UAP-AC Outdoor Enterprise WiFi System).Incorporates both 2.4 and 5GHz radios. Best of both worlds, but cost is substantially higher and the omni antennas are fixed. This "AC" model is 3x3 MIMO with throughput up to 450Mb/s. Fixed antennas.Indoor UniFi models come in several flavors, but they tend to match the specs of the outdoor models. Most come in an attractive round smoke detector form factor with fixed antennas. The best way to see the lineup is to go to the Ubiquiti product page here: ubnt dot com /products/#all/wireless. I tend to skip any versions with LR (long range) in the model number. Experience indicates that it is preferable to have a greater number of medium range APs indoors as opposed to a smaller number of high-powered APs. Again, the AP must be able to receive a signal from lower powered client devices.Finally, when purchasing a UniFi AP be advised that there are two generations of the APs. The second generation have "AC" in the model name and are capable of higher speeds. They AC models have been a bit problematic so be sure to download the latest firmware for the model you purchase.Hope this helps! 4I have grown to love Ubiquiti Unifi I have grown to love Ubiquiti Unifi. The USG combined with a Unifi managed switch and AP; the total price was actually less than flagship routers from Asus and the like. This setup blows them away. No one in my family has complained once about unreliable wifi since I switched months ago. I had a virtualized pfSense machine to route traffic but the Unifi USG integrated so well, and the Controller software has added many firewall-type features to the USG over the last year and a half or so. Unifi had a great app for mobile devices, too, to manage controllers and sites as well.One negative I've noticed is temperature. These devices get hot. I grabbed a 15$ USB powered fan to get some active cooling going on. Without the fan, days over 80 degrees would make the usg and switch especially go over what felt like 150 degrees F. I could barely touch them they'd get so hot. A 80 mm USB fan meant for living room entertainment cabinets did the trick.I'm trying to get my family to convert to Unifi So I can throw them all on my Ubuntu controller host and manage them all from anywhere. 5half of a good replacement for Tomato wifi/router (and at same cost) This Unifi AP-AC Lite was purchased in tandem with an Edgerouter X to replace an ASUS N16 that had been running Shibby Tomato.The combination cost about the same as a mid-range wifi router (about $150). Configuration is more involved, but much finer grained control of wifi (and routing, but not part of this review) is possible.REPLACING TOMATOThe Tomato open source community has been a great resource for a decade, and it's been a stable platform for routers starting with the Linksys WRT54GL on through to ASUS 802.11AC devices. Unforutnately, some newer consumer wifi products have closed firmware that makes Tomato more difficult for developers to maintain. Other devices now lock down the bootloader or use non-Broadcom hardware, which make open source less feasible.Ubiquiti devices require OEM software (as far as I know), which is no different from a closed router. Unlike consumer routers, the administration interface gives full control of the device through the command line. The slightly higher level of IT skill required for Ubiquiti gear has yielded a large and large and active user community online where answers to most configuration and operational issues can be found from other users or Ubiquiti staff. My experience with consumer devices is that vendor support dries up fairly quickly once the device is discontinued. It appears that Ubiquiti continues to support its older devices. Updates are discussed openly by the manufacturer on the forums and arrive in timely fashion. When a PHP vulnerability from very old code was identified, the manufacturer responded quickly to patch it and push out an update.The basic set up wizard gets you off the ground easily, as long as you're kind of person who knows the difference between 192.168.1.0 and 12.140.132.0. (hint: one's private and one's public). Actually, you probably don't need to know that, just basic familiarly with screen wizards, accessing IP addresses from browser.Keep in mind this device is an access point only. It does not handle routing tasks that are native to the consumer wifi units with separate WAN and LAN ports. As such, the UniFi has just one port, for Ethernet. Power comes through the Ethernet connection, sourced either from a Power Over Ethernet capable switch or router at the other end, or from the power injector included with single-unit packages. Note that not all POE supplies are created equal; what an older or different branded switch provides in voltage and power may differ from the UniFi's requirements. I did not research this deeply as I simply used the included power injector.I will continue to use Tomato on devices where it's stable and supported. The ASUS RT-N12, for example, works well as an access point and router if 100Mhz LAN and 2.4 Ghz wifi is sufficient (and when the N16 failed, I found that both Netflix and Chromecast were perfectly happy with this $30 router). But for getting the most out of a high speed connection, particularly with respect to latency, more horsepower is needed. Ubiquiti's gear is giving me that, even at its least expensive level.PERFORMANCERange is greatly improved over all the Netgear and Asus devices I've had in its place. Latency is also improved. DHCP connections, particularly to Android devices, happen more quickly.Physically, this particular unit sits inconspicuously atop a row of books high up on built in shelf, connected by one flat Cat 6 Ethernet ribbon cable. Another Cat 6 connection runs between the PoE injector and the router. The PoE can be located anywhere between the switch port and the UniFi. This means the UniFi can be set up without a nearby power outlet.The UniFi allows multiple SSIDs and VLANs. There is a radio scanner that provides an intuitive and useful graphical display of deployed channels and interference (and a visualization of why 40 Mhz 2.4 Ghz channels are a bad idea in a crowded environment). The user interface is sophisticated and stable. The control interface requires a locally installed program (the "UniFi Controller" that then will use a native browser session for display.WIth the Edgerouter (or any other router), some of the reporting features such as historical latency and throughput charts are not available unless a "UniFi Security Gateway" is connected. I chose to forgo that device in favor of the Edgerouter X, which was less expensive, had more available wired ports, and all the capability I need for my setup. 5
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